Monthly Archives: May 2013

Project 365: Quadruple One-Sentance Post.

This post will be brief on text and rich in pictures because I’m catching up for my next post, which will be of yesterday’s photos. If you want a hint as to the subject matter of that upcoming update, read the entry from May 24th!

And without further ado:

Image

#144: Papaya Tree.

The farm is dotted with these volunteers, and we eagerly await the ripping fruit!

 

Image

#145: Doggy again!

We got caught in the rain on a walk and she chilled on the grass as we waited under a friendly tree.

 

Image

#146: Random Healthy Food.

I honestly can’t remember if this was breakfast or lunch; either way, it was yummy and made of organic granola, villi sprinkled with cinnamon, nutmeg, and ginger powders, and homemade vanilla extract, topped with banana.

 

Image

#147: Orchids in Ohia.

When Mum gets a new orchid, she transplants it into a coconut husk and lashes them to the Ohia trees, where their roots will eventually take over and hold them in place as they would in the wild.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Project 365

Project 354: #143: Oil Painting.

Image

At 20″ x 16″, this is a rather larger canvas than the last one I posted about. But like the other one, I link it to a study of the traditional elements. I started it when I was focused on the wisdom of Earth in my OBOD lessons. It was ribbons of browns and yellows and greens, with hints of red. It was a very soothing picture of the colors of Earth.

When I moved on to study Water, I felt inspired to add the ribbons of blue, and realized that this painting was not just about Earth, but about combining the lessons from each element as I moved through them. And what better expression of Bardic wisdom than as artwork of some nature?

Recently, though I finished the lessons of Air a couple months ago and have since begun working with Fire, I finally added the ribbons of white that I knew needed to be there. I’m not sure if more ribbons will be added when I’m done with the Fire lessons, or if this canvas is for the Celtic elements of Earth, Sea, and Sky, through which Fire transforms each to each other. We shall see…

Leave a comment

Filed under Project 365

Project 365: Double Post, Expecting.

Image

#141: Filling the Pen.

The big blue machine is Dad’s wood-chipper. He’s been filling two of the pig pens up to capacity again in preparation for the eventual weening of the piglets, who are expected soon but are as yet unborn.

The bottoms of the pens are ground level, lined with plastic, layered with logs to create airspace and thus keep the environment aerobic (a key part of Korean Natural Farming), and finally filled to the top of the tin walls with woodchips, IMOs (indigenous microorganisms), etc.

Creating this kind of deep litter pen makes a friendly home for the IMOs to flourish, which helps keep the pigs healthy and happy. It also makes the whole place smell of nothing more offensive that the good earthy dirt, and even then only on occasion. The IMOs are so quick and efficient at breaking down everything that not only do they take care of anything smelly the pigs produce, but they also are constantly lowering the level of the bedding as they decompose the wood chips into soil. Dad is constantly having to add more wood chips, and never has to muck out or remove anything but what we might choose to utilize elsewhere on the farm.

Image

#142: Pregnant Mama.

This is Big Mama. She’s due within the week, and her sister Spot have her litter three weeks after that. Both our sows have created mud-pits for themselves in an attempt to cool off as the weather turns towards hot sunny summer days.

When a pig gets near her due date — gestation is three months, three weeks, and three(ish) days — the litter ‘drops’ and suddenly her belly is nearly dragging on the ground from the added bulk of piglets, and she gets a hollow between back and belly. It’s at about that point when you can start to see the piglets squirming around instead of just feeling them, and that the mama stops trying to get up for anything less that actual food. The inevitable feeling of sympathy for the heavily pregnant and obviously less-than-comfortable mama is drawn from her caretakers, and we all wait for the birth.

After the birth, the piglets will soon be running around and pestering her and annoying each other and napping in an adorable heap before running around again, as little kids tend to do. Once they start to naturally wean themselves, at about five weeks or so due to their fast growth (thanks to the Korean Natural Farming Method!), Dad will move the mama into her new pen and leave the piglets in the familiar territory until they are picked up by the people who bought them or raised to butchering weight. And the sows will be bred again, and thus the whole cycle continues…

Leave a comment

Filed under Project 365

Project 365: #140: Donkey.

Image

I’ve been doing review classes with one of my teachers, in preparation for the state licensing test as a Massage Therapist. One of the other teachers works the land our school is on, and I couldn’t resist showing it off a little.

This photo is taken from the main road, and one of those buildings in the background is our “classroom”: a open-walled roofed platform, with a chalkboard, table and chairs, massage table, and bookshelves. Surrounding it is farmland, with fruit and veggies growing, and many animals being raised (including the very friendly donkey above).

It’s an idyllic setting for learning about healing arts. And most convenient of all, though it feels like being in an isolated paradise, it’s actually just on the outskirts of Hilo.

Leave a comment

Filed under Project 365

Project 365: One Sentence Triptych #2.

Image

#137: Honu.

The local sea turtles napping on the sands of Punalu’u.

 

Image

#138: Akatsuka Orchid Gardens.

Stop in here — near Volcano National Park — if you have any curiosity about the hundreds of varieties or the growth of orchids!

 

Image

#139: Packing.

The inevitable end of house-sitting.

Leave a comment

Filed under Project 365

Project 365: Double Post, Fresh Produce.

Image

#135: Snack.

Every once in a while, I like to show off what great fresh produce I eat here on the island. It makes the best meals and snacks.

I love that I can just munch on raw veggies full of delicious flavor and healthy goodness, and feel full and satisfied without being stuffed or having that slow heavy feeling of digesting more processed food.

The above photo: carrots, green beans, zucchini, and cucumber — all from the local Farmers’ Market in Hilo.

Also from the Hilo Farmers’ Market…

Image

#136: Breakfast.

I made this tasty treat from papaya, banana, and (store-bought) Greek yogurt. Pretty and yummy enough to be desert, yet healthy and filling enough to be breakfast!

This is one of my absolute favorite things about island life: fresh fruit and veggies all year long.

Leave a comment

Filed under Project 365

Project 365: Double Post, the Sky.

Image

#133: Midday.

I love those literal silver-lined storm-cloud moments, when the sky seems like it’s being deliberately dramatic. To me, clouds are the greatest of abstract artists: always being new and inventive while still producing the classics better than any master painter. And always, always so beautiful.

The sky is one of my touchstones; when I need calming or centering, or simply to gain perspective or distraction, I just have to remember to look up.

 

Image

#134: Sunrise.

For some reason I woke up at 5am this day and actually felt like getting up. This meant, of course, that I would be able to photography the fifteen-odd minutes that there was color in the sky for the sunrise.

Being at sea-level with no mountain-ranges about means we don’t really get those long pre-dawn or twilight times of day I was so used to in North Idaho, where the world is still and light lingers without shining. Here the sun is either up and roasting hot, or down and it’s so dark you can see all the stars. The in-between times are very minimal.

Leave a comment

Filed under Project 365